The mobile teacher and her classroom library.

 

At my new school, we don’t have our own classrooms.
We know that providing students with a classroom library is essential to building their literacy skills.  Having easy access to high-interest books is the number one thing that has helped me promote choice reading.  So when I first found out that I wouldn’t have my “own” classroom, I worried about how I’d be able to provide classroom library access to all of my students.

Luckily, I spend half of my teaching day in the same classroom, the giant American Studies room, which also homes my giant classroom library.

These books are all organized by genre or category, helping students navigate on their own if I’m not immediately available to help.

classroomlibrary

Our classroom library, before/after a book pass.

 

Classroom library on wheels.
My writing class meets in a different room, which is only a few doors down from the American Studies room, but it’s far enough away that the classroom library doesn’t feel like our classroom library.  Since many of my students don’t take American Studies, they’re a little nervous about walking into the room and interrupting a class to browse our books.

My school is very supportive of choice reading and helped me problem solve, purchasing a mobile bookshelf that I use to cart my book-talked books, new books, and most popular books with me into the writing lab.  Books are organized by category and genre on the cart too, and this moves back in the American Studies classroom with me in the afternoon.

But even though I have our most popular and talked about books on the mobile cart, I still find myself leaving the room to pull more recommendations from the larger, classroom library.  (Thankfully I have a paraprofessional in that class who can hold down the silent reading fort for the few minutes it takes!)

Being a “teacher on a cart” has made the implementation of a successful choice reading program a bit more challenging, but I’m navigating!  By  next year, I’ll be a champ.

book-mobile

My bookmobile.

 

recommendation-pile

Choosing a new book from a pile of instant recommendations

Why can’t students just use the school library?
The school library and the classroom library work together.  One is not better than the other…it’s just more access to books!

My students still use the school library to check out books!  Our librarian is awesome and really helpful.  But…most of the kids who go down to the learning commons to check out books already have an idea of what they want.

My classroom (or mobile) library is a place where I easily pull out ten books that I know a student will like.  I can support them through their struggle to find the right book.  Even though I’m still getting to know my students, I’m getting to know exactly what they want to read, and being able to instantly pile ten books on their desk that I think they’ll love couldn’t happen without my classroom library.

Hopefully, in a few months, those struggling readers will build confidence and author-interest to navigate our learning commons on their own.

readinginwriting
TL;DR:
Last summer, many teachers told me that it would be impossible to incorporate choice reading because they didn’t have a place to hold a classroom library.  It’s not impossible.  It’s difficult and takes creative thinking to provide immediate access to books, but it’s possible.  

Advertisements

Our Best Books of the Year

While there is always a lot of diversity in the books that my students pick as their choice reads, these books have been our “most read” and “must-reads” this year.

the-martian-book-cover-530x806
The Martian
by Andy Weir
Despite it being adult-targeted science fiction, this has been the most popular book in our classroom this year by miles.  Space scares me.  I didn’t want to read this, but after I read the first sentence,  I was hooked.  (You will be too.)  Mark Watney is one of the greatest characters to ever exist, and even though I was terrified for him the entire time, I loved.this.book.  I bought two copies because I left mine on my desk over a weekend and couldn’t face the weekend without it.

b5fqxzwceaa0dhu

Winger/Stand-Off by Andrew Smith
I’m not shy about my gigantic author crush on Andrew Smith.  Winger and its sequel, Stand-Off, have been read by almost everyone in my classes at this point.  Winger begins with its protagonist, Ryan Dean West, beginning boarding school as a 14-year-old junior.  It’s hilarious, and then it ruins your life.  My students tell me that Stand-Off makes you feel a little bit better about life, but I haven’t read it yet because I can’t keep it on my shelf.    This summer!

81a2bxnajqyl

Running With Scissors by Augusten Burroughs
This makes the list of “most popular books” every.single.year.  This memoir was published in 2002, but I can’t keep it on my shelf for more than a day.  It’s popular with both genders, and I think that’s because it has some crazy passages, inappropriate language, and risque chapters.  It’s also stolen from our classroom library every year, which to me, is the mark of a great book.  

51b6k2glkcl-_sy344_bo1204203200_
Prisoner B-3087
by Alan Gratz
This book is about a Jewish boy in the 1930s who experiences 10 different concentration camps.  It’s (obviously) sad, but because it’s not as excruciatingly graphic as a book like Night, it makes for a great choice read.  This short novel is actually intended for middle-grade students, but my high school students have enjoyed it all year.  Many students who read military history and military memoirs pick this up as an “easy” read.  

41gueuczdzl-_sx329_bo1204203200_
The Art of Being Normal
by Lisa Williamson
Despite being an LGBTQ advocate, I never truly understood what it’s like being a transgender person until I read this book about a person who is born male, but identifies as female.  This book gives a much-needed voice to transgender teens while also providing emotional moments and plot twists.  Plus, because it’s British, it makes you feel super fancy while you read it.  

51vuchdzq-l-_sx331_bo1204203200_
The 5th Wave
by Rick Yancey
Our classroom copy of The 5th Wave has been well-read this year because of the film release.  I hesitated in picking this up (because, remember, space scares me), but I’m glad that I did, even though I had nightmares for two weeks.  This science fiction book has a storyline that’s grounded in reality, with an average teenage girl discovering that her world is about to be destroyed by aliens.  Because it’s science fiction combined with romance, all kinds of readers liked this one, including me.  

tumblr_np21bbp70m1qihjk1o1_500

To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before/PS I still Love You by Jenny Han
These are so popular in my classroom and I loved them too. In this series, sixteen-year-old Lara Jean writes love letters to all of the boys that she’s had crushes on, and locks the letters in a box in her closet.  When her younger sister finds and mails them, she’s faced with a lot of awkward explanation, and then finds herself in a love triangle.  At the end of the second book, most of us threw it across the room.

paperback-escape-from-camp-14_unapproved
Escape from Camp 14
by Blane Harden
I gratefully received my copy of this book at the NCTE convention in Boston a few years ago, and it’s been a hit with my students ever since.  This biography details Shin Dong-hyuk, the only known person to escape from an internment camp in North Korea. Because it gives readers a glimpse into what life is really like in North Korea, it instantly hooks readers.  This book has appealed to many students who are interested in military history, but it’s also been read by students who enjoy realistic fiction and memoir.

(My students helped me write and edit this post through writing workshop!)